Dark Deception: Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

Dark Deception Nancy Mehl

Dark Deception – Too Dark for Me

I was so excited to receive a copy of Nancy Mehl’s newest release, Dark Deception. It is the second in her Defenders of Justice series, and I really liked her first novel (Fatal Frost) in the series (see my review here.) I wanted to like it, but it was really just too dark for me.

Dark Deception follows Katie O’Brien, a survivor of a tormented serial killer that killed her twin sister. She’s in the witness protection program and deputy U.S. Marshal Tony DeLuca has vowed to keep her safe at all costs. When it looks as if the killer may go free, Katie is called upon to testify. But will she get that opportunity? Can Tony keep Katie safe? Will more have to die before this is resolved?

I was given Dark Deception in exchange for my honest review. It was very bleak. To be in the mind of a killer is not a place I like to be. There was a lot of focus on the actual killings. I think the point could have come across without so much gore. There were several redemptive characters, and Mehl did a good job of intertwining faith and God into the storyline without being preachy. The book can be read as a stand-alone, but characters from Book One are mentioned and it may be confusing to a first-time reader. Additionally, there were a LOT of moving parts. I understand this is a mystery, but there were almost too many characters to keep track of. I’m a fan of Nancy Mehl’s, but Dark Deception is not my favorite.


Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!


First time visiting us? Subscribe for email updates or find us on FacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram!

Amish Guys Don’t Call: Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

Amish Guys Don’t Call

Amish Guys Don’t Call – Don’t Bother

As a self-proclaimed amishaholic, I scoured around, looking for any titles with “Amish” in it. When I came across Amish Guys Don’t Call by Debby Dodds, it piqued my curiosity. Just how “Amish” was this novel? Would it stay true to Amish values and ideals? The answer to that would be no. If you like horror films, the movie Mean Girls, and the not-very-Amish reality show Breaking Amish, then this might – might – appeal to you.

Amish Guys Don’t Call tells the story of 16-year-old Sam. Sam has a past she’s trying to get away from. When she and her single mom land in Pennsylvania, drama ensues. She becomes part of an elite clique at her school (see Mean Girls reference), is completely obsessed with horror flicks (this is not a passing theme; it’s throughout the novel – and is completely over the top), and meets a cute guy named Zac, who is (you guessed it) ex-Amish. The novel drips with teen angst.

I was given this book in exchange for my honest review. It’s most certainly not my favorite. Perhaps that’s because the premise of the entire book is off. Yes, I suppose an occasional ex-Amish guy wouldn’t call due to no phone. But most teens in their rumspringa not only have phones, but they even text. And if they do not have one readily available, they find one. The horror references were insane and many were just uncalled for. Was the author trying to be “hip” using references such as “AF”? If so, she fails. This novel does more harm than good in representing the Amish. For GOOD young adult fiction that address the Amish, try Kathleen Fuller’s Mysteries of Middlefield series, or Beverly Lewis’s SummerHill Secrets series. Both are classics, and still speak of teens in torment without going overboard.


Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!


First time visiting us? Subscribe for email updates or find us on FacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram!

What the Bishop Saw: Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

What-the-Bishop-Saw

What the Bishop Saw – TBR-Pile-Worthy

I was so stoked to see a new release from Vannetta Chapman. What the Bishop Saw is such a captivating title! But would the novel measure up? Oh, yes! It’s a page-turner – go ahead and rest up before starting this one because many sleepless nights are ahead!

What the Bishop Saw follows Bishop Henry Lapp. After an injury in his childhood, he developed a unique condition. He can draw, to unbelievable precision, what his subconscious sees. It’s not anything he asked for, or really wants, but this gift may prove useful as his community faces off with a murderer and an arsonist. How many lives will be affected? Investigators must rely on what the bishop saw.

I was given What the Bishop Saw in exchange for my honest review. It was tremendous and thought-provoking. Vannetta Chapman did an amazing job of giving the characters depth and charm. Bishop Lapp is winsome and I found myself wishing I knew him in real life! A definite win for Chapman – add another to your TBR pile!


Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!


First time visiting us? Subscribe for email updates or find us on FacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram!