Raging Storm: Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

Raging Storm

Raging Storm – Not Amish, but Amazing!

So, no surprise that I am a fan of Amish fiction. It draws me in like no other. But I seem to have found another genre to pique my interest: Dystopian (the opposite of Utopian). I was already a fan of Vannetta Chapman’s Amish fiction writings when I was given the opportunity to read the prequel to her Remnant series, Overshadowed. I was completely hooked. If you know me, then you know I’ve GOT to read things in order! I snagged a copy of Book One, Deep Shadows, before venturing into Book Two, Raging Storm. It is a serious page-turner! Mark my words: You will lose sleep reading this one!

Raging Storm picks up where Deep Shadows left off. Shelby and her devoted crew of friends are headed to Austin, along with the mysterious Dr. Bhatti. It seems that every corner, every road, every person is a problem waiting to happen. But Shelby is determined to get the much-needed insulin for her son Carter. Even if they CAN get to Austin, will they make it back? Carter is in High Fields with Max’s parents. High Fields has been tame and protected – until now. Who is the case of this danger in their little farm community?

I was given Raging Storm in exchange for my honest review. It was exceptional. It can be read as a stand-alone, but I HIGHLY recommend reading Deep Shadows first to give the story greater, richer context. Chapman’s writing is tremendous. I truly felt the struggles of Shelby’s group, and cheered them on all the way – and even got mad a couple of times! It’s been a while since I’ve read a book of this caliber. I just could NOT put it down. Bring on Book Three…NOW! I need my dystopian fix! If you liked the TV series Jericho, then you’ll love Raging Storm – which could easily be made into a movie or miniseries!

Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!


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Murder Tightly Knit Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

Murder Tightly Knit – A Purl of a Book! 

Vannetta Chapman has slowly gained prominence in the Amish genre. Her ability to weave a storyline together so intricately that the reader is thoroughly ensconced after only two pages is proof of her talents. Murder Tightly Knit (second in her Amish Village Mystery series) does exactly that. Be prepared to lose some sleep as you flip page after page, late into the night!

When Owen Esch shows up dead on the Pumpkin Vine Trail, lots of questions come into play. Why is Mary from the Cat’s Meow Yarn Shop acting so strangely? Who is the mystery Englischer hanging around town? Soon the police, as well as a vexing federal investigator have descended upon the quiet village. But it looks like it may take a faithful few – Mary’s friend Hannah Troyer, and Mary’s boss Amber Bowman, to help unravel this mystery.

I was given Murder Tightly Knit in exchange for my honest review. It was excellent. Although there were some references to the storyline of the first book in the series (Murder Simply Brewed), Murder Tightly Knit can be read as a stand-alone, but I highly recommend reading them in sequence. Chapman has outdone herself with this novel, exploring a topic that I have yet to have read about in the hundreds of Amish novels I have read previously (are you curious??). Well done, Vannetta Chapman! Grab your favorite dose of caffeine and be prepared to be carried away by Murder Tightly Knit. Yes, it’s that good.


Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!

An Amish Cradle – Not Much Rock – Review by Susan Scott Ferrell

an amish cradleHaving read so many other Amish novella collections, including An Amish Wedding, An Amish Kitchen, and most recently An Amish Garden, I was thrilled to receive An Amish Cradle. With well-known authors Beth Wiseman, Amy Clipston, Kathleen Fuller and Vannetta Chapman collaborating on this time, I felt certain it would be a collection to remember – and it was, but not for the reasons that I hoped.

Wisemans’s In His Father’s Arms tells the story of Ruth Anne, expectant mother, brimming with joy and awaiting the birth of her child along with her best friend, who is also due around the same time. But when Ruth Anne’s babe is born with Down Syndrome, it proves a challenge for all involved.

Clipston’s A Son for Always tells of Carolyn and Joshua, who are expecting their first child together. But Carolyn has a child from another relationship and worries that she alone must provide for him. At the same time, Joshua struggles to put rumors at rest within the community as he allows his wife to work through her own personal struggles.

Fuller’s A Heart Full tells the refreshing story of Ellie, who has her hands full. She is blind, has an overbearing mother…and she’s expecting twins! Although Ellie’s mamm has always been overprotective, the birth of the twins kicks her into high gear…but why? Mamm’s secret is finally revealed.

Chapman’s An Unexpected Blessing tells of Etta, who at 42 is surprised to be giving birth to another child. As a typical mom, she has many worries – the health of this tiny babe, the whereabouts of one of her children who has jumped the fence, and whether she and her husband will be able to keep their land.

I was given An Amish Cradle in exchange for my honest review. While I appreciated the unifying theme of trusting God, I was disappointed that there was not more focus on the babies and/or the births themselves. I naturally assumed with a title like An Amish Cradle that there would be more of an emphasis on such. Furthermore, the majority of the novellas seemed to fall flat. Many of the stories could have been told with fewer words. At times, the dialogues and/or narrations seemed forced. I have loved the writings of all of these authors individually, but I was underwhelmed with this particular collection. That being said, if you are an avid reader of these authors, you will get a glimpse of some of the characters they have written about in their previous works.


Susan Ferrell and her husband make their home in the Atlanta Metro area. Although Susan struggles with chronic migraine headaches, she stays very busy as a stay-at-home mom to one very precocious little girl. While catching her breath, she feeds her Amishaholic tendencies by reading vast amounts of Amish literature!